A UseNet terminology primer: How to search for movies, porn and music on EasyNews

UseNet is by far the biggest open secret of file sharing and free content. Using the NNTP protocol, it predates BitTorrent and LimeWire, even the world wide web itself as the mainstay of file sharers who swap encoded binary attachments containing everything from MP3 music files, to porn, console game ISO disc images and movie DVD rips.

Almost every Internet Service Provider (ISP) includes access to some sort of UseNet server as part of the monthly line subscription – although details for how to access the server are usually buried somewhere in the small print of your contract agreement. In addition to the lack of support for UseNet from ISPs, very often the NNTP server access provided rarely has good article retention, i.e., the amount of articles posted to the server are only stored for a small number of days. ISPs also usually further restrict which news groups you can access, censoring the binaries.erotica and the binaries.movies groups.

The best way to ensure a good connection speed, a high article retention ratio and good privacy controls, is to pay a subscription each month for access to a private server. Perhaps the most important consideration of all, when choosing a third party UseNet provider is security. Given the level of surveillance world governments are increasingly allowing themselves to hold over their drones.. ..I mean tax paying citizens, these days, it’s never been more important for individuals to secure and take personal responsibility for their on-line privacy.

UseNet's hierarchical groups can be very simply thought of as different e-mail boxes which anyone can read and post to, sorted by topic.  Each distinct topic is additionally sorted into different groups.  So for example MP3 music files of country music are separated from MP3 files of heavy metal, but both kinds of music might be found in a group simply dedicated to music released in the 1980s.

UseNet's hierarchical groups can be very simply thought of as different e-mail boxes which anyone can read and post to, sorted by topic. Each distinct topic is additionally sorted into different groups. So for example MP3 music files of country music are separated from MP3 files of heavy metal, but both kinds of music might be found in a group simply dedicated to music released in the 1980s.

EasyNews is, in my opinion, the best UseNet provider in this regard. They hold none of your personal details on their servers and do not track which articles you have viewed or posted. They cost $9.98 (£5.46) for 20 Gigabytes access to 100 days worth of articles per month. This gives you access to a web-based front end to their servers, with search and filter functions, as well as access to a range of local mirrors in several locations around the world for better connection speeds and connection reliability.

As well as the web-based front end to their servers, you can also open a direct link to EasyNews’s NNTP servers, by using any one of many UseNet software clients, such as the excellent XNews for Windows or the elegant and easy to use Unison, for Mac OS.

How to search EasyNews

You can search EasyNews using their search engine Global4 – which as well as being protected by a secure SSL certificate, has tremendously flexible regular expression filters.

For example, you can search globally for anything posted to all of EasyNews’s servers which contains a certain key word, or filter that keyword down by file type, newsgroup, date posted, name of poster and so on. Files with a JPEG image attachment or known video file type, will include a thumbnail preview of the files found in your search window, as shown below (Fig.1).

Fig.2 (below) shows a more general search term (any image or video file containing the word ‘Ferrari’) and how to use an exclamation mark to exclude any words which appear after it in any search box, to filter out any content which contains your keyword but which is from a newsgroup known to contain spam or lots of off-topic postings.

By combining regular expressions, with filters that only include (or exclude) certain group names, you can narrow down what you’re looking for from the millions of articles posted every day to UseNet servers around the world on a myriad of topics, ranging from obscure jazz music recordings to the latest in-cinema pirate camcorders of blockbuster movies. Once you’ve found what you’re looking for, however, it’s not always a simple case of clicking “Save As..” and waiting for your download to begin.

Terminology

Because all UseNet content has to be uploaded by someone – so-to-speak – manually and because some people are, for want of a better word, stupid, you might at first find it difficult to understand some of the terminology used to indicate what some of the content posted to UseNet actually is and which of it is worth grabbing and which is probably not worth the bandwidth. Here’s some terms you might want to familiarise yourself with and how acronyms can help you narrow your search terms down when looking for the best quality content.

  • DVR / DVDR / DvDRIP – Ripped from DVD. Usually a good indicator that a movie file is of good quality.
  • XviD / DivX – The compression type used to convert the video file.
  • Cam / TS / Screener – Can mean different things to different people. Generally speaking a TS (standing for Telecine or TeleSync) means that the original film print has been transferred to video using special equipment, but it can also refer to lens attachments used to rip the film off-projector, by a projectionist of questionable ethics in-cinema. This method often produces an inferior picture quality and is generally used to describe video files which feature newly released movies complete with someone walking right in-front of the screen to go for a piss, just as the whole plot of the film is being spelled out by the badly muffled, blurry shapes on the screen.
  • Screener / DVD Screener are often ‘for your consideration‘ DVDs which, with the exception of an occasional on-screen nag banner or (becoming more common) a permanent lower third watermark, are usually perfect digital transfers of the original print, made using professional TS transfer equipment. Such files have often been pre-released to members of Film and Television Academies charged with handing out awards and critiques of soon-to-be released movies, such as magazine journalists, analysts or other entertainment industry insiders, who for a nominal back-hander courtesy of the pool boy’s second cousin twice removed have illegally ripped the content onto their computer’s hard drive and posted them to BitTorrent or UseNet, so that industrial scale pirates in Asia can burn them to DVD and sell them on the black market for $2 a pop to dumb American tourists, who don’t realise that by patronising large scale copyright theft they’re directly funding child prostitution and drug smuggling. That these people are often protected by the nature of their otherwise good legitimate standing within the entertainment community makes it hard to gather reliable evidence on their activities and so the Motion Picture Association of America simply sues the low hanging fruit of ordinary people who only download very occasionally and strictly for their own personal use. But I digress, point made.
  • Files containing .001, .002, .003 sequential numbers or RAR and PAR in place of .mpg or .mp4, .avi file extensions. Files with number extensions have been split into manageable sections either by the user who posted them or by the software they used to upload large files, which exceed the maximum attachment size for individual articles. You can join these kinds of files together using various freeware tools for Mac, Linux and PC. Here’s a guide for doing this in Windows and various tools to do the same job in Mac OS X.

    Files with PAR and RAR file names have been split using the RAR archive and compression utility. Generally speaking RAR files contain the main bulk of the content you wish to later join back into a whole file and PAR files are the check-sum of those main archive files. Simply put this means that if a RAR archive is incomplete, because the poster has either had their connection interrupted while they were uploading the content, or because the article is old and the UseNet server you are connected to has begun to flush older articles from the cache, by using the PAR redundancy files the archive can still be re-built without necessarily having to have completely downloaded all of the original RAR archive files. Read more on reconstructing incomplete RAR files here.

  • FLAC / SHN / APE. MP3 is a types of file compression which, literally, removes all kinds of data from the audio file to make it smaller and easier to transfer. FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec) is a method for miniaturising the audio file, contained on a CD, without stripping away any of the data which gives the sound a wide range of musical fidelity. SHN and APE are, generally speaking, variations on the lossless theme.
  • Lossless files are generally posted to dedicated newsgroups for collectors and traders of music which requires as great a dynamic audio range as possible, in order to be best appreciated, e.g., classical music from an analogue source, such as vinyl / 8-track / 16 track or original master tapes.

  • REQ and FILLS. REQ is short for ‘request for fills’. A poster might include REQ in his or her subject headers, in order to alert anyone downloading the files that it is not a complete collection. For example the subject header might read ‘The Best of Buddy Holly – REQ‘ – which means the poster would appreciate anyone with any more files of Buddy Holly music to post what they have, if this adds to those which have already been listed. Similarly, ‘Here’s some Elvis FILLS: REQ Chuck Berry‘ is a sure sign the poster is looking to trade 50s rock and roll music with anyone interested in what he or she is sharing.

I hope this encourages you to get out there and take a look at what’s on offer via UseNet. Don’t forget that there are whole chunks of UseNet which are free to search, read and contribute to via Google’s excellent groups.google.com – with a wide range of topics on politics and science, education and the arts.

8 comments on “A UseNet terminology primer: How to search for movies, porn and music on EasyNews

  1. Pingback: free public access servers | Download anything usenet info service

  2. sextir.com is a free porn site – We provide the world with free: porn videos,porn movies,xxx free movies,free porn,free sex.
    Best porn hub and tube on the web

  3. sextir.com is a free porn site – We provide the world with free: porn videos,porn movies,xxx free movies,free porn,free sex.
    Best porn hub and tube on the web

  4. Great article and tutorial so to speak. Easynews is great and “easy to navigate”. Yes, the Usenet has fallen in popularity due to the www but, with providers like easynews making it easier and less technical to view, I think we can expect a rise in Usenet traffic and popularity. Thanks again

  5. naturally like your web site however you need to check the spelling on quite a few of your posts.

    Many of them are rife with spelling issues and I in finding it very
    bothersome to inform the truth however I’ll definitely come back again.

  6. Google Sniper 2.0 runs on the simple strategy that anyone can use
    and above all make money from. This strategy involves creating “sniper sites” that rank increasingly simple on search engines like Google, Yahoo
    and Bing. These sniper sites are seen on the first pages of Google
    for low competition keywords which can be ready to increase your profits.

    This formula first ever seen with Google Sniper is dependant on using Exact Match Domains (EMD’s).
    Using exact match domains remains a great way to get high Google rankings with marginal effort.
    How do I know? Because I make over $14,852.

    52 monthly with my sniper sites.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s